Internet Slander

Internet slander is when a person or a group of people use the Internet to falsely vilify; libel; slander; spread malicious gossip and/or to harass others. They usually do it either to gain a competitive advantage or to settle a score or through pure malevolence due to envy. These people have established certain patterns of behaviour. Below are a few tips in dealing with Internet slander should you have the misfortune of becoming a victim.

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Modelling contracts

10 good reasons for modelling contracts between model agencies and other mother agencies; model agencies and models; and model agencies and clients that book models are:

1. A photographer introduced to the model can contact the model directly to take images. Such images may be commercially exploited leaving the model agency out of the loop.

2. Clients introduced to a model by an agency may contact the model directly cutting out the model agency.

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Bloggers Defamation

Bloggers Defamation

The following is a recommended bloggers defamation code of ethics by Daniel J. Solove, Associate professor, George Washington University Law School

1. People should delete offensive comments quickly if asked.

2. People should ask permission before speaking about others private lives.

3. Someone who speaks about another’s private life without her consent should take steps to conceal her identity.

4. People should avoid posting pictures of other people without getting their consent.

5. People should avoid Internet shaming.

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Modelling Agencies

What modelling agencies do is a mystery to most people. My fashion modelling career started at the tender age of 14. After finishing in the top five, in a country wide modelling contest, I began strutting my stuff in Milan and Berlin for Gucci and Agent Provocateur. But I still had no idea how a modelling agency actually worked. I decided to quit modelling when I met my husband. It will always be a delightful time of my life.

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A legal perspective on rated website content

So you want to set up a website which includes rated video blogs; live camera footage; and photographs. Here are some of the important issues to consider to keep your website on the right side of the law.

1. First and foremost in relation to children: it is of the highest importance that you actively protect children. It is recommended that you work with the police to help to prosecute any users that might be involved in harming children. The Protection of Children Act 1978 sets out the UK law. Other countries have their own stringent laws with regards to the exploitation of children.

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Company online harassment

Company online harassment?

PAIL® Solicitors specialists in online anti-social behaviour cases review whether company online harassment is possible

In Kosar v. Bank of Scotland Plc [t/a Halifax]: QBD [Admin] [Mr Justice Silber]: 18 January 2011:

The appellant (Kosar) appealed against a district judge`s decision that the offence of harassment under section 2[1] of the Protection from Harassment Act 1997 could only be committed by a person who was an individual against another individual person. The judges allowed the appeal. That is to say, they held that a Company can be a person for the purposes of the Act when they are the perpetrators of harassment but not as victims of harassment.

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Internet Solicitors

lnternet Solicitors have a set of skills acquired through experience in legal practice and continuous study that allows them to identify, analyse, and find the appropriate solution to an Internet related legal problems. With this in mind we thought that it would be helpful to list 7 tips on instructing lnternet Solicitors you find via a search engine or Google ads on the Internet.

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Child Modelling

Under the Children and Young Persons Act 1933 and the Children (Northern Ireland) Order 1995 a child aged fifteen or under cannot be engaged for paid modelling work unless the model agency obtains a children’s performance license from the local authority in the locality where the child resides.

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